Centre for Internet & Society

Big Data and Reproductive Health in India: A Case Study of the Mother and Child Tracking System

by Ambika Tandon

In this case study undertaken as part of the Big Data for Development (BD4D) network, Ambika Tandon evaluates the Mother and Child Tracking System (MCTS) as data-driven initiative in reproductive health at the national level in India. The study also assesses the potential of MCTS to contribute towards the big data landscape on reproductive health in the country, as the Indian state’s imagination of health informatics moves towards big data.

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Doing Standpoint Theory

by Ambika Tandon and Aayush Rathi

Feminist research methodology has evolved from different epistemologies, with several different schools of thought. Some of the more popular ones are feminist standpoint theory, feminist empiricism, and feminist relativism. Standpoint theory holds the experiences of the marginalised as the source of ‘truth’ about structures of oppression, which is silenced by traditional objectivist research methods as they produce knowledge from the standpoint of voices in positions of power. In this essay published on the GenderIT website, Ambika Tandon and Aayush Rathi [1] discuss the practical applicability of these epistemologies to research practices in the field of technology and gender.

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Digital mediation of domestic and care work in India: Project Announcement

by Ambika Tandon and Aayush Rathi

It is our great pleasure to announce that we are undertaking a study on digital mediation of domestic and care work in India, as part of and supported by the Feminist Internet Research Network led by the Association for Progressive Communications (APC), funded by the International Development Research Centre (IDRC). The study is exploring the ways in which structural inequalities, such as those of gender and class, are being reproduced or challenged by digital platforms. The project sites are Delhi and Bangalore, where we are conducting interviews with workers, companies, and unions. In Bangalore, we are collaborating with Stree Jagruti Samiti to collect qualitative data from different stakeholders. The outputs of the research will include a report, policy brief, and other communication materials in English, Hindi, and Kannada. This study is being led by Ambika Tandon and Aayush Rathi, along with Sumandro Chattapadhyay.

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September 2019 Newsletter

by Prasad Krishna

The newsletter for the month of September 2019.

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Kashmir’s digital blackout marks a period darker than the dark side of the moon

by Nishant Shah

While we mourn the loss of connection with the moon, remembering a digital blackout closer home.

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Essays on #List — Selected Abstracts

by Puthiya Purayil Sneha

In response to a recent call for essays that social, economic, cultural, political, infrastructural, or aesthetic dimensions of the #List, we received 11 abstracts. Out of these, we have selected 4 pieces to be published as part of a series titled #List on the [email protected] blog. Please find below the details of the selected abstracts. The call for essays on #List remains open, and we are accepting and assessing the incoming abstracts on a rolling basis.

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August 2019 Newsletter

by Prasad Krishna

Centre for Internet & Society newsletter for the month of August 2019.

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Workshop on Archival Standards and Digitisation Workflow

by Admin

P.P. Sneha attended a workshop on Archival Standards and Digitization Workflow organised by the British Library at NCBS, Bangalore, on August 19 - 20, 2019.

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Digital Native: How free is the internet?

by Nishant Shah

It is contradictory and confusing as it amplifies as well as destabilises the order of things.

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Simiran Lalvani - Workers’ fictive kinship relations in Mumbai app-based food delivery

by Sumandro Chattapadhyay

Working in the gig-economy has been associated with economic vulnerabilities. However, there are also moral and affective vulnerabilities as workers find their worth measured everyday by their performance of—and at—work and in every interaction and movement. This essay by Simiran Lalvani is the first among a series of writings by research fellows associated with the 'Mapping Digital Labour in India' project at the CIS, supported by research assistance from Azim Premji University, being published on the Platypus blog of the Committee on the Anthropology of Science, Technology, and Computing (CASTAC). The essay is edited by Noopur Raval, who is co-leading the project concerned.

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