Centre for Internet & Society

Tech Anthropology Today: Collaborate, Rather than Fetishize from Afar

by Geert Lovink and Ramesh Srinivasan

"That is why the 'offline' if you will is so critical to understanding the 'online'—because they do not exist in isolation and what we have constructed is an illusory binary between the two." In this interview, Geert Lovink discusses with Ramesh Srinivasan: “how can we embrace the realities of communities too-often relegated to the margins?”

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Digital native: Lie Me a River

by Nishant Shah

The sea of social media around us often drowns the truth, exchanging misinformation for facts.

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Digital Native: People Like Us

by Nishant Shah

How the algorithm decides what you see on your timeline. If you have been hanging out on social media, there is one thing you can’t have escaped — a filter bubble. Be it demonetisation and its discontents, the fake news stories that seem to have ruined the US election, or the eternal conflict about the nature of Indian politics, your timeline must have been filled largely by people who think like you.

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Digital native: The View from My Bubble

by Nishant Shah

In the digital world, the privileged have the power to deny a devastating crisis for the poor.

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Digital native: The Voices in Our Heads

by Nishant Shah

What if our phones were to go silent? Would you be able to deal with the silence?

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Digital Native: The Future is Now

by Nishant Shah

The digital is not just an addition but the new norm in our lives, and it might not be all good. There used to be a popular joke among technology geeks when Bluetooth arrived on our mobile devices — everything becomes better with Bluetooth.

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Love in the Time of Tinder

by Nishant Shah

Service providers and information aggregators mine our information and share it in ways that we cannot imagine.

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Mobilizing Online Consensus: Net Neutrality and the India Subreddit

by Sujeet George

This essay by Sujeet George is part of the 'Studying Internet in India' series. The author offers a preliminary gesture towards understanding reddit’s usage and breadth in the Indian context. Through an analysis of the “India” subreddit and examining the manner and context in which information and ideas are shared, proposed, and debunked, the paper aspires to formulate a methodology for interrogating sites like reddit that offer the possibilities of social mediation, even as users maintain a limited amount of privacy. At the same time, to what extent can such news aggregator sites direct the ways in which opinions and news flows change course as a true marker of information generation responding to user inputs.

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How Green is the Internet? The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

by Aishwarya Panicker

This essay by Aishwarya Panicker is part of the 'Studying Internet in India' series. The author draws attention to the fact that there is little data, debate, analysis, and examination of the environmental impact of the internet, which is true especially for India. She explores four central issue areas. First, as the third highest country in terms of internet use, what is the current environmental impact of internet usage in India? Second, are there any regulatory provisions that give prescriptive measures to data centres and providers? Third, do any global standards exist in this regard and finally, what future steps can be taken (by the government, civil society and individuals) to address this?

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Quarter Life Crisis: The World Wide Web turns 25 this year

by Nishant Shah

With the unexplained ban on websites, the state seems to have stopped caring for the digital rights of its citizens.

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