Centre for Internet & Society

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Blog Entry Negative of porn
by Namita A. Malhotra published Sep 12, 2009 last modified Aug 02, 2011 08:35 AM — filed under: , ,
The post deals with what has been written about Savita Bhabhi in an attempt to make sense of her peccadiloes and with the seeming futility of Porn studies located in America to our different reality. I take the liberty of exploring my own experiential account of pornography since I feel that in that account (mine and others) when done seriously, certain aspects of pornography emerge that address questions that are about cinema, images, sex, philosophy and how desire works. The title is mischeviously inspired from Dr. Pek Van Andel's recent video of MRI images of people having sex.
Located in RAW / / Blogs / Porn: Law, Video & Technology
Net Neutrality Resources
by Prasad Krishna published Mar 29, 2017 last modified Apr 22, 2017 09:11 AM — filed under: , , ,
Submissions by the Centre for Internet and Society to TRAI and DoT, 2015-2017.
Located in Internet Governance / Resources
Blog Entry New Contexts and Sites of Humanities Practice in the Digital (Paper)
by Puthiya Purayil Sneha published Jun 25, 2018 last modified Dec 06, 2019 05:03 AM — filed under: , , , , ,
The ubiquitous presence of the ‘digital’ over the couple of decades has brought with it several important changes in interdisciplinary forms of research and knowledge production. Particularly in the arts and humanities, the role of digital technologies and internet has always been a rather contentious one, with more debate spurred now due to the growth of fields like humanities computing, digital humanities (henceforth DH) and cultural analytics. Even as these fields signal several shifts in scholarship, pedagogy and practice, portending a futuristic imagination of the role of technology in academia and practice on the one hand, they also reflect continuing challenges related to the digital divide, and more specifically politics around the growth and sustenance of the humanities disciplines. A specific criticism within more recent debates around the origin story of DH in fact, has been its Anglo-American framing, drawing upon a history in humanities computing and textual studies, and located within a larger neoliberal imagination of the university and academia. While this has been met with resistance from across different spaces, thus calling for more diversity and representation in the discourse, it is also reflective of the need to trace and contextualize more local forms of practice and pedagogy in the digital as efforts to address these global concerns. This essay by Puthiya Purayil Sneha draws upon excerpts from a study on the field of DH and related practices in India, to outline the diverse contexts of humanities practice with the advent of the digital and explore the developing discourse around DH in the Indian context.
Located in RAW
Blog Entry NIE Steps in to Grow Konkani Wikipedia
by T. Vishnu Vardhan published Sep 06, 2014 last modified Oct 10, 2014 11:26 AM — filed under: , , , , , ,
The Centre for Internet & Society's Access to Knowledge team (CIS-A2K) signed a memorandum of agreement (MoU) with Nirmala Institute of Education, Goa to enhance digital literacy in Konkani in the education sector across Goa.
Located in Openness / Blog
Blog Entry No more 66A!
by Geetha Hariharan published Mar 24, 2015 last modified Mar 26, 2015 02:01 AM — filed under: , , , , , , , ,
In a landmark decision, the Supreme Court has struck down Section 66A. Today was a great day for freedom of speech on the Internet! When Section 66A was in operation, if you made a statement that led to offence, you could be prosecuted. We are an offence-friendly nation, judging by media reports in the last year. It was a year of book-bans, website blocking and takedown requests. Facebook’s Transparency Report showed that next to the US, India made the most requests for information about user accounts. A complaint under Section 66A would be a ground for such requests.
Located in Internet Governance / Blog
Blog Entry Non Unicode ISCII Text Can be Converted to Unicode Now!
by Subhashish Panigrahi published Dec 19, 2012 last modified Dec 21, 2012 09:59 AM — filed under: , , ,
Odia Wikipedian Manoj Sahukar has designed a new tool which can convert non Unicode ISCII text to Odia Unicode text. A majority of the digitized text and web content of newspapers and books are in non unicode text which now could be used for Wikipedia and other Odia Wiki projects. This opens a new arena for digitized free license books in Odia language.
Located in Openness / Blog
Blog Entry Not a Goodbye; More a ‘Come Again’: Thoughts on being Research Director at a moment of transition
by Nishant Shah published Jun 15, 2014 — filed under: , , ,
As I slowly make the news of my transition from being the Research Director at the Centre for Internet and Society, Bangalore, to taking up a professorship at the Leuphana University, Lueneburg, Germany, there is a question that I am often asked: “Are you going to start a new research centre?” And the answer, for the most part, is “No.”
Located in RAW
Blog Entry Not Just Fancy Television
by Nishant Shah published Dec 08, 2012 last modified Apr 24, 2015 11:45 AM — filed under: , , ,
Nishant Shah reviews Ben Hammersley's book "64 Things You Need to Know for Then: How to Face the Digital Future Without Fear ", published by Hodder & Stoughton
Located in Digital Natives / Blog
Blog Entry On Talking Back: A Report on the Taiwan Workshop
by Prasad Krishna published Sep 09, 2010 last modified Jan 03, 2012 10:35 AM — filed under: ,
What does it mean to Talk Back? Who do we Talk Back against? Are we alone in our attempts or a part of a larger community? How do we use digital technologies to find other peers and stake-holders? What is the language and vocabulary we use to successfully articulate our problems? How do we negotiate with structures of power to fight for our rights? These were the kind of questions that the Talking Back workshop held in the Institute of Ethnology, Academia Sinica in Taiwan from 16 to 18 August 2010 posed.
Located in Digital Natives / Blog
Blog Entry On World Water Day - Open Data for Water Resources
by Sumandro Chattapadhyay published Mar 22, 2018 last modified Jan 28, 2019 02:41 PM — filed under: , , , , , , ,
Lack of open data for researchers and activists is a key barrier against ensuring access to water and planning for sustainable management of water resources. In a collaboration between DataMeet and CIS, supported by Arghyam, we are exploring the early steps for making open data and tools to plan for water resources accessible to all. To celebrate the World Water Day 2018, we are sharing what we have been working on in the past few months - a paper on open data for water studies in India, and a web app to make open water data easily explorable and usable. Craig Dsouza led this collaboration, and authored this post.
Located in Openness