Centre for Internet & Society

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Blog Entry To be Counted When They Count You: Words of Caution for the Gender Data Revolution
by Noopur Raval published Feb 01, 2022 — filed under: , , , , ,
In 2015, after the announcement of the SDGs or Sustainable Development Goals, a new global developmental framework through the year 2030, the United Nations described data as the “lifeblood of decision-making and the raw material for accountability” for the purpose of realizing these developmental goals. This curious yet key link between these new developmental goals and the use of quantitative data for agenda setting invited a flurry of big data-led initiatives such as but not limited to Data2X, that sought to further strengthen and solidify the relationship between ‘Big Development’ and ‘Big Data.’
Located in RAW
Blog Entry Atmanirbhar Bharat Meets Digital India: An Evaluation of COVID-19 Relief for Migrants
by Ankan Barman published Jun 03, 2021 — filed under: , , , , , ,
With the onset of the national lockdown on 24th March 2020 in response to the outbreak of COVID-19, the fate of millions of migrant workers was left uncertain. In addition, lack of enumeration and registration of migrant workers became a major obstacle for all State Governments and the Central Government to channelize relief and welfare measures.
Located in RAW
File Atmanirbhar Bharat Meets Digital India
by Ankan Barman published Jun 03, 2021 — filed under: , ,
Located in RAW / Files
Blog Entry Silicon Plateau: Volume Two
by Puthiya Purayil Sneha published Dec 19, 2018 last modified Mar 13, 2019 01:01 AM — filed under: , , , , ,
Silicon Plateau is an art project and publishing series that explores the intersection of technology, culture and society in the Indian city of Bangalore. Each volume of the series is a themed repository for research, artworks, essays and interviews that observe the ways technology permeates the urban environment and the lives of its inhabitants. This project is an attempt at creating collaborative research into art and technology, beginning by inviting an interdisciplinary group of contributors (from artists, designers and writers, to researchers, anthropologists and entrepreneurs) to participate in the making of each volume.
Located in RAW
Blog Entry Digital transitions in the newsroom: How are Indian language papers adapting differently?
by Zeenab Aneez published Jan 16, 2017 last modified Feb 03, 2017 01:50 AM — filed under: , , ,
In a new report published by the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism and Centre for Internet and Society, Zeenab Aneez explores how Indian newsrooms are adapting their workflow and processes to cater to an increasing digital audience and the implications these changes have on how journalists produce news.
Located in RAW
Blog Entry Indian Newspapers' Digital Transition
by Zeenab Aneez published Dec 09, 2016 last modified Dec 09, 2016 07:12 AM — filed under: , , , , , , ,
This report examines the digital transition underway at three leading newspapers in India, the Dainik Jagran in Hindi, English-language Hindustan Times, and Malayala Manorama in Malayalam. Our focus is on how they are changing their newsroom organisation and journalistic work to expand their digital presence and adapt to a changing media environment. The report comes out of a collaboration between the CIS and the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism, University of Oxford, and was supported by the latter. The research was undertaken by Zeenab Aneez, with contributions from Rasmus Kleis Nielsen, Vibodh Parthasarathi, and Sumandro Chattapadhyay.
Located in RAW
File Book 1: To Be, Digital AlterNatives with a Cause?
by Nishant Shah last modified May 15, 2015 12:08 PM — filed under: , , ,
In this first book of the Digital AlterNatives with a Cause? Collection, we concentrate on what it means to be a Digital Native. Within popular scholarship and discourse, it is presumed that digital natives are born digital. Ranging from Mark Prensky’s original conception of the identity which marked all people born after 1980 as Digital Natives to John Palfrey and Urs Gasser’s more nuanced understanding of specific young people in certain parts of the world as ‘Born Digital’, there remains a presumption that the young peoples’ relationship with technology is automatic and natural. In particular, the idea of being ‘born digital’ signifies that there are people who, at a visceral, unlearned level, respond to digital technologies. This idea of being born digital hides the complex mechanics of infrastructure, access, affordability, learning, education, language, gender, etc. that play a significant role in determining who gets to become a digital native and how s/he achieves it. In this book, we explore what it means to be a digital native in emerging information societies. The different contributions in this book posit what it means to be a digital native in different parts of the world. However, none of the contribution accepts the name ‘Digital Native’ as a given. Instead, the different authors demonstrate how there can be no one singular definition of a Digital Native. In fact, they show how, contextualised, historical, socially embedded, politically nuanced understanding of people’s interaction with technology provide a better insight into how one becomes a digital native.
Located in Digital Natives
File Digital Natives with a Cause? Thinkathon: Position Paper
by Prasad Krishna last modified May 08, 2015 12:22 PM — filed under: , , , ,
The Digital Natives with a Cause? research inquiry seeks to look at the potentials of social change and political participation through technology practices of people in emerging ICT contexts. In particular it aims to address knowledge gaps that exist in the scholarship, practice and popular discourse around an increasing usage, adoption and integration of digital and Internet technologies in social transformation processes. A conference called Digital Natives with a Cause? Thinkathon was jointly organised by CIS and Hivos in the Hague in December 2010. The Thinkathon aimed to reflect on these innovations in social transformation processes and its effects on development, and in particular to understand how new processes of social transformation can be supported and sustained, how they can inform our existing practices, and provide avenues of collaboration between Digital Natives and "Analogue Activists".
Located in Digital Natives / Publications
File Digital Natives with a Cause? Report
by Prasad Krishna last modified Apr 17, 2015 11:04 AM — filed under: , , ,
Youth are often seen as potential agents of change for reshaping their own societies. By 2010, the global youth population is expected reach almost 1.2 billion of which 85% reside in developing countries. Unleashing the potential of even a part of this group in developing countries promises a substantially impact on societies. Especially now when youths thriving on digital technologies flood universities, work forces, and governments and could facilitate radical restructuring of the world we live in. So, it’s time we start listening to them.
Located in Digital Natives / Publications
Blog Entry Whose Change is it Anyway?
by Nishant Shah published Jun 18, 2013 last modified Apr 17, 2015 10:56 AM — filed under: , , , , , ,
This thought piece is an attempt to reflect critically on existing practices of “making change” and its implications for the future of citizen action in information and network societies. It observes that change is constantly and explicitly invoked at different stages in research, practice, and policy in relation to digital technologies, citizen action, and network societies.
Located in Digital Natives / Blog