Centre for Internet & Society

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Blog Entry Unlock = Open, not Choked!
by Shyam Ponappa published Jun 15, 2020 — filed under: , ,
Don't let a virus stall initiatives and weaken the economy.
Located in Telecom / Blog
Blog Entry 'I feel the pain of having nowhere to go': A Manipuri Trans Woman Recounts Her Ongoing Lockdown Ordeal
by Santa Khurai published Jun 22, 2020 last modified Jun 22, 2020 11:42 AM — filed under: , , , ,
"My life and work in Bengaluru came to an abrupt halt with the COVID-19 outbreak and lockdown this March. We no longer had jobs and were forced to plan our departure from the city." -- As told to Santa Khurai, Manipur-based queer and Nupi Manbi activist, artist and writer. Compiled by Aayush Rathi, a cisgender, heterosexual man, and researcher with Centre for Internet and Society, India. This account is part of an ongoing CIS research project on gender, welfare and surveillance in India, and is supported by Privacy International, UK.
Located in RAW
Blog Entry COVID-19 Charter Of Recommendations on Gig Work
by Aayush Rathi and Ambika Tandon published Apr 30, 2020 last modified May 13, 2020 08:53 AM — filed under: , , , , , , , , ,
Tandem Research and the Centre for Internet and Society organised a webinar on 9 April 2020, with unions representing gig workers and researchers studying labour rights and gig work, to uncover the experiences of gig workers during the lockdown. Based on the discussion, the participants of the webinar have drafted a set of recommendations for government agencies and platform companies to safeguard workers’ well being. Here are excerpts from this charter of recommendation shared with multiple central and state government agencies and platforms companies.
Located in RAW
Blog Entry A Compilation of Research on the Gig Economy
by Aayush Rathi, Ambika Tandon, Sumandro Chattapadhyay published May 19, 2020 — filed under: , , , , , , , ,
Over the past year, researchers at CIS have been studying gig economies and gig workers in India. Their work has involved consultative discussions with domestic workers, food delivery workers, taxi drivers, trade union leaders, and government representatives to document the state of gig work in India, and highlight the concerns of gig workers. The imposition of a severe lockdown in India in response to the outbreak of COVID-19 has left gig workers in precarious positions. Without the privilege of social distancing, these workers are having to contend with a drastic reduction in income, while also placing themselves at heightened health risks.
Located in RAW
Blog Entry DWRU, BBGS & MKU - The Covid-19 Pandemic and the Invisible Workers of the Household Economy
by Geeta Menon published Jun 16, 2020 last modified Jun 19, 2020 12:34 PM — filed under: , , , ,
Domestic Workers Rights Union (DWRU), Bruhat Bangalore Gruhakarmika Sangha (BBGS), and Manegelasa Kaarmikara Union (MKU) have prepared a report on the invisibilisation of domestic workers under the Covid-19 pandemic and a set of demands directed at the government and resident welfare associations (RWAs) for better, dignified and just treatment of domestic workers in Karnataka. We at CIS are proud to contribute to and publish this work as part of the ongoing 'Feminist Internet Research Network' project supported by the Association for Progressive Communications (APC).
Located in RAW
Blog Entry Raina Roy and Abhiraj Bag - Kolkata’s trans community has been locked out of healthcare and livelihood
by Raina Roy and Abhiraj Bag published Aug 01, 2020 last modified Aug 01, 2020 02:54 PM — filed under: , , , ,
Over six months into the outbreak of Covid-19 in India, it has become clear that the pandemic does not affect everybody equally. It has amplified the sufferings of the already-marginalised trans community. Raina Roy spoke to 10 trans persons and trans rights activists in Kolkata over the course of the past few months to better understand the situation. The piece was transcribed by Abhiraj Bag and edited by Kaarika Das and Srravya C, researchers at the Centre for Internet and Society, India. This work is part of a project at CIS on gender, welfare and surveillance, supported by Privacy International, United Kingdom.
Located in RAW