Centre for Internet & Society

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Blog Entry India's Broken Internet Laws Need a Shot of Multi-stakeholderism
by Pranesh Prakash published Apr 26, 2012 last modified Apr 26, 2012 01:45 PM — filed under: , , , , , ,
Cyber-laws in India are severely flawed, with neither lawyers nor technologists being able to understand them, and the Cyber-Law Group in DEIT being incapable of framing fair, just, and informed laws and policies. Pranesh Prakash suggests they learn from the DEIT's Internet Governance Division, and Brazil, and adopt multi-stakeholderism as a core principle of Internet policy-making.
Located in Internet Governance / Blog
Mufti Aijaz Arshad Qasmi v. Facebook and Ors (Order dated December 20, 2011)
by Pranesh Prakash published Feb 20, 2012 last modified Feb 20, 2012 06:02 PM — filed under: , , , , , , ,
This is the order passed on December 20, 2011 by Addl. Civil Judge Mukesh Kumar of the Rohini Courts, New Delhi. All errors of spelling, syntax, logic, and law are present in the original.
Located in Internet Governance / Resources
Blog Entry Press Coverage of Online Censorship Row
by Pranesh Prakash published Dec 08, 2011 last modified Dec 08, 2011 11:31 AM — filed under: , , , , , ,
We are maintaining a rolling blog with press references to the row created by the proposal by the Union Minister for Communications and Information Technology to pre-screen user-generated Internet content.
Located in Internet Governance / Blog
Blog Entry Digital AlterNatives with a Cause?
by Nishant Shah published Sep 15, 2011 last modified Apr 10, 2015 09:22 AM — filed under: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Hivos and the Centre for Internet and Society have consolidated their three year knowledge inquiry into the field of youth, technology and change in a four book collective “Digital AlterNatives with a cause?”. This collaboratively produced collective, edited by Nishant Shah and Fieke Jansen, asks critical and pertinent questions about theory and practice around 'digital revolutions' in a post MENA (Middle East - North Africa) world. It works with multiple vocabularies and frameworks and produces dialogues and conversations between digital natives, academic and research scholars, practitioners, development agencies and corporate structures to examine the nature and practice of digital natives in emerging contexts from the Global South.
Located in Digital Natives / Blog
Blog Entry Change has come to all of us
by Nishant Shah published Oct 24, 2010 last modified Mar 13, 2012 10:43 AM — filed under: , , , ,
The general focus on a digital generational divide makes us believe that generations are separated by the digital axis, and that the gap is widening. There is a growing anxiety voiced by an older generation that the digital natives they encounter — in their homes, schools and universities and at workplaces — are a new breed with an entirely different set of vocabularies and lifestyles which are unintelligible and inaccessible. It is time we started pushing the boundaries of what it means to be a digital native.
Located in Digital Natives / Blog
Does the Safe-Harbor Program Adequately Address Third Parties Online?
by Rebecca Schild published Apr 16, 2010 last modified Aug 02, 2011 07:19 AM — filed under: , , , ,
While many citizens outside of the US and EU benefit from the data privacy provisions the Safe Harbor Program, it remains unclear how successfully the program can govern privacy practices when third-parties continue to gain more rights over personal data. Using Facebook as a site of analysis, I will attempt to shed light on the deficiencies of the framework for addressing the complexity of data flows in the online ecosystem.
Located in Internet Governance / Blog
Blog Entry The (in)Visible Subject: Power, Privacy and Social Networking
by Rebecca Schild published Feb 26, 2010 last modified Aug 18, 2011 05:06 AM — filed under: , , ,
In this entry, I will argue that the interplay between privacy and power on social network sites works ultimately to subject individuals to the gaze of others, or to alternatively render them invisible. Individual choices concerning privacy preferences must, therefore, be informed by the intrinsic relationship which exists between publicness/privateness and subjectivity/obscurity.
Located in Openness / Blog