Centre for Internet & Society

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India's landmark online speech ruling is step toward greater press freedom
by Prasad Krishna published Mar 29, 2015 — filed under: , , , ,
In an historic decision, India's Supreme Court on Tuesday struck down part of a law used to silence criticism and free expression. While this marks a pivotal victory that has been welcomed in many quarters, many challenges remain for press freedom in the country.
Located in Internet Governance / News & Media
Blog Entry Three reasons why 66A verdict is momentous
by Pranesh Prakash published Mar 29, 2015 — filed under: , , , ,
Earlier this week, the fundamental right to freedom of expression posted a momentous victory. The nation's top court struck down the much-reviled Section 66A of the IT Act — which criminalized communications that are "grossly offensive", cause "annoyance", etc — as "unconstitutionally vague", "arbitrarily, excessively, and disproportionately" encumbering freedom of speech, and likely to have a "chilling effect" on legitimate speech.
Located in Internet Governance / Blog
SECTION 66A: DELETE
by Prasad Krishna published Mar 30, 2015 — filed under: , , , ,
The Supreme Court has killed a law that allowed the Government to control social media. What’s the Net worth of freedom hereafter?
Located in Internet Governance / News & Media
You can still get into trouble for online posts: Digital law experts
by Prasad Krishna published Mar 30, 2015 last modified Apr 02, 2015 01:44 AM — filed under: , , , ,
The internet in India is freer now, but individuals could still to get into trouble for online posts, say digital media and law experts. Hailing the Supreme Court judgment on Tuesday as a landmark verdict for free speech in India, experts who have closely read the judgment say there is much to be careful about too.
Located in Internet Governance / News & Media
India High Court: No Takedown Requests On Social Sites Without Court, Gov't Order
by Prasad Krishna published Mar 25, 2015 last modified Apr 03, 2015 06:18 AM — filed under: , , , ,
Indian police will no longer be able to threaten Internet users and online intermediaries with jail merely on the basis of a complaint that they have posted “offensive” posts online.
Located in Internet Governance / News & Media
Blog Entry Fear, Uncertainty and Doubt
by Sunil Abraham published Mar 26, 2015 last modified Apr 17, 2015 01:44 AM — filed under: , , , ,
Much confusion has resulted from the Section 66A verdict. Some people are convinced that online speech is now without any reasonable restrictions under Article 19 (2) of the Constitution. This is completely false.
Located in Internet Governance / Blog
Blog Entry Shreya Singhal and 66A
by Sunil Abraham published Apr 11, 2015 last modified Apr 19, 2015 08:09 AM — filed under: , , , ,
Most software code has dependencies. Simple and reproducible methods exist for mapping and understanding the impact of these dependencies. Legal code also has dependencies --across court orders and within a single court order. And since court orders are not produced using a structured mark-up language, experts are required to understand the precedential value of a court order.
Located in Internet Governance / Blog
The thrill of saving India from cybercrime
by Prasad Krishna published Nov 21, 2016 — filed under: , ,
Geeks seize the chance to help the government, defence forces and banks draw up fences against tech crimes.
Located in Internet Governance / News & Media
Women arrested for Facebook post: Did cops act under Sena pressure?
by Prasad Krishna published Nov 19, 2012 last modified Nov 21, 2012 11:17 AM — filed under: , , , ,
After Bal Thackeray's death, during the Mumbai Bandh, a 21-year-old criticised the shutdown on her Facebook page — her friend approved of it — next thing they know, they are facing a case, and this morning they were arrested.
Located in News & Media
The flaw in cyber law
by Prasad Krishna published Nov 30, 2012 last modified Nov 30, 2012 09:06 AM — filed under: , ,
Legal experts and netizens want the controversial clause in the IT Act to be scrapped after two Mumbai girls were arrested for a post on Facebook.
Located in News & Media