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Mapping the Things that Affect Us
by Prasad Krishna published May 03, 2010 last modified Oct 05, 2015 03:05 PM — filed under: , ,
'Map for making change' is a project using geographical mapping techniques to support struggles for social justice in India
Located in News & Media
Their India has No Borders
by Anja Kovacs published Apr 29, 2010 last modified Oct 05, 2015 03:08 PM — filed under: , ,
Bangalore felt far for them, they would mark it outside the country. India, for migrant labourers, is different from the India we know
Located in News & Media
Maps for Making Change - The First Workshop
by Anja Kovacs published Dec 02, 2009 last modified Oct 05, 2015 03:09 PM — filed under: , , , , ,
In this first workshop in a series of three, participants will think through the potential of mapping in the context of a project that they have suggested in their application and the preparations they need to make to make these ideas a reality.
Located in Events
Public Event: Exploring Maps for Making Change
by Anja Kovacs published Apr 24, 2010 last modified Oct 24, 2015 02:19 PM — filed under: , , , ,
The Centre for Internet and Society, in collaboration with Tactical Tech, would like to invite you to 'A Conversation on Maps for Making Change - Using Geographical Mapping Techniques to Support Struggles for Social Justice in India', at the Centre for Internet and Society in Bangalore.
Located in Events
Second Maps for Making Change Workshop: Using Geographical Mapping Techniques to Support Struggles for Social Justice in India
by Anja Kovacs published Jan 30, 2010 last modified Oct 05, 2015 03:09 PM — filed under: , , , , ,
The second workshop of the Maps for Making Change project will take place at the National Institute of Design in Ahmedabad, from 1 until 3 February 2010. The workshop will allow a select group of activists and supporters of social movements and campaigns in India to start developing digital maps that they can use in their advocacy work, under the expert guidance of international digital mapping rights activists, Indian mapping experts, design professionals and techies with an interest in activism. The workshop is organised by the Centre for Internet and Society and Tactical Tech, in cooperation with MediaShala at NID.
Located in Events
Third Maps for Making Change Workshop: Using Geographical Mapping Techniques to Support Struggles for Social Justice in India
by Anja Kovacs published Apr 24, 2010 last modified Oct 05, 2015 03:10 PM — filed under: , , , , ,
The third and final workshop in the Maps for Making Change project will take place at Visthar, in Bangalore, from 26 until 28 April. During this workshop, participants will fine-tune and polish their maps; explore ways to connect with broader movements and disseminate their maps among target audiences; and reflect on their own experiences so as to distill learnings that can help us decide where to go from here. While participation in the workshop is closed, the workshop will end with a public event at the CIS office on 28 April, from 4 pm onwards, open to everybody (more information to follow soon). If you, too, share our interest in mapping for social change, then do join us there.
Located in Events
Designing Urban Nervous Systems
by Ambika Tandon published Mar 26, 2018 last modified Apr 20, 2018 05:28 AM — filed under: , , ,
Dr. Anupam Saraph will be holding a talk on 'Designing urban nervous systems' at the CIS on Tuesday, March 27, 2018 at 3:30 p.m. The talk will revolve around looking at cities as living organisms, with nervous systems at the center of their being.
Located in RAW
Blog Entry Information Infrastructures, State, and Citizens: An Initial Literature Survey
by Khetrimayum Monish Singh published Mar 28, 2018 last modified May 15, 2018 03:22 PM — filed under: , , , , , , ,
Our approach to unpacking the nature of the updated National Register of Citizens (NRC) as an information infrastructure is centered on how it mediates the relationship between the Indian state and its citizens. In this sense, an information infrastructure is not end in itself, rather it is a means to an end. In our case, the end is the eventual differentiation between citizens and immigrants in Assam and the updated NRC is the means to practically achieve it. As the updated NRC is put to use, it simultaneously creates a particular conception of what the Indian state looks like and defines a new terrain of making claims to citizenship. By extension, it creates a new form of Indian citizenship enacted by tuples of data stored in the updated NRC. Thus, while paying close attention to the historical narratives of identity politics in Assam (Baruah 1999; Hazarika 1994; Roy 2010), our initial survey of literature speaks to the nature of this mediation. We focus on how scholars in a diversity of fields, ranging from Information Science (IS) and Science and Technology Studies (STS) to Anthropology and Political Science, have engaged with how state infrastructures mediate the state-citizen relationship. We have divided this literature survey into three parts and we will specify the questions that we would like to ask of our field at the end of each part. This survey was undertaken by Khetrimayum Monish Singh, Ranjit Singh, Palashi Vaghela, and Nazifa Ahmed.
Located in RAW
Blog Entry What scares a Digital Native? Blogathon
by Samuel Tettner published May 02, 2011 last modified May 14, 2015 12:16 PM — filed under: , ,
What Scares technologized young people around the world? In an effort to present a view often not heard in traditional discourses, on Monday the 18th of April 2011, young people from across the world blogged about their fears in relation to the digitalisation of society.
Located in Digital Natives / Blog
Blog Entry Digital Natives : Talking Back
by Nishant Shah published Aug 17, 2010 last modified May 15, 2015 11:50 AM — filed under: , , , , , ,
One of the most significant transitions in the landscape of social and political movements, is how younger users of technology, in their interaction with new and innovative technologised platforms have taken up responsibility to respond to crises in their local and immediate environments, relying upon their digital networks, virtual communities and platforms. In the last decade or so, the digital natives, in universities as well as in work spaces, as they experimented with the potentials of internet technologies, have launched successful socio-political campaigns which have worked unexpectedly and often without precedent, in the way they mobilised local contexts and global outreach to address issues of deep political and social concern. But what do we really know about this Digital Natives revolution?
Located in Digital Natives / Blog