Centre for Internet & Society

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Research Symposium on Digital Transitions in Cultural and Creative Industries in India, New Delhi, Feb 27-28
by Sumandro Chattapadhyay published Feb 11, 2018 last modified Feb 26, 2018 11:04 AM — filed under: , , , , , ,
It is our privilege to collaborate with LabEx ICCA (Université Paris 13), UNESCO New Delhi, Centre for Social Sciences and Humanities (CSH), and Centre d'études de l'Inde et de l'Asie du Sud (CEIAS), to organise a Research Symposium on Digital Transitions in Cultural and Creative Industries in India. The symposium gathers researchers and practitioners engaging with the changing landscape of cultural and creative industries in India in the context of the rapid expansion of digital technologies and social media. We invite you to join us for a critical exploration of the prevalent discourse around cultural and creative industries, to identify what could be the different forms of digital creative and cultural industries developing in India, and how they problematise the questions of cultural expression, knowledge production, creativity, and labour.
Located in RAW
Blog Entry Rethinking Conditions of Access
by Sneha PP published Oct 15, 2014 last modified Nov 13, 2015 05:35 AM — filed under: , , , ,
P. P. Sneha explores the possibilities of redefining the idea of access through the channels of education and learning.
Located in RAW
Blog Entry Rethinking the last mile Problem: A cultural argument
by Nishant Shah published Sep 02, 2009 last modified Apr 03, 2015 10:54 AM — filed under: , , ,
This research project, by Ashish Rajadhyaksha from the Centre for the Study of Culture and Society, is mainly a conceptual-archival investigation into India’s history for what has in recent years come to be known as the ‘last mile’ problem. The term itself comes from communication theory, with in turn an ancestry in social anthropology, and concerns itself with (1) identifying the eventual recipient/beneficiary of any communication message, (2) discovering new ways by which messages can be delivered intact, i.e. without either distortion of decay. Exploring the intersection of government policy, technology intervention and the users' expectations, with a specific focus on Internet Technologies and their space in the good governance protocols in India, the project aims at revisiting the last mile problem as one of cultural practices and political contexts in India.
Located in RAW / / Blogs / The Last Cultural Mile
Blog Entry Revealing Protesters on the Fringe: Crucifixion Protest in Paraguay
by Denisse Albornoz published Sep 20, 2013 last modified Apr 17, 2015 10:51 AM — filed under: , , ,
An analysis of the crucifix protest in Paraguay in the light of Nishant Shah’s piece: Whose Change is it Anyway? The blog post looks at the physical and symbolic spaces in which narratives of change were conceived and the extent to which information circulating within activates citizen action.
Located in Digital Natives / Blog
Blog Entry Revisiting Techno-euphoria
by Nishant Shah published Jul 11, 2012 last modified Apr 24, 2015 11:53 AM — filed under: , ,
In my last post, I talked about techno-euphoria as a condition that seems to mark much of our discourse around digital technologies and the promise of the future. The euphoria, as I had suggested, manifests itself either as a utopian view of how digital technologies are going to change the future that we inhabit, or woes of despair about how the overdetermination of the digital is killing the very fibre of our social fabric.
Located in Digital Natives
Blog Entry Roundtable on India’s Gig-work Economy
by Noopur Raval, Anushree Gupta, Rajendra Jadhav, Sarah Zia, and Simiran Lalvani published Feb 05, 2020 last modified May 19, 2020 06:36 AM — filed under: , , , , , , ,
Working in the gig-economy has been associated with economic vulnerabilities. However, there are also moral and affective vulnerabilities as workers find their worth measured everyday by their performance of—and at—work and in every interaction and movement. This roundtable discussion marks the end of our series on 'India’s Gig-work Economy' published by the Platypus blog of the Committee on the Anthropology of Science, Technology, and Computing (CASTAC). In this discussion, the researchers reflect on methods, challenges, inter-subjectivities and possible future directions for research on the topic. Listen to the audio track below or read the transcript for the full discussion.
Located in RAW
Blog Entry Sameet Panda - Data Systems in Welfare: Impact of the JAM Trinity on Pension & PDS in Odisha during COVID-19
by Sameet Panda published Feb 26, 2021 last modified Feb 26, 2021 07:36 AM — filed under: , , , , , ,
This study by Sameet Panda tries to understand the integration of data and digital systems in welfare delivery in Odisha. It brings out the impact of welfare digitalisation on beneficiaries through primary data collected in November 2020. The researcher is thankful to community members for sharing their lived experiences during course of the study. Fieldwork was undertaken in three panchayats of Bhawanipatna block of Kalahandi district, Odisha. Additional research support was provided by Apurv Vivek and Vipul Kumar, and editorial contributions were made by Ambika Tandon (Senior Researcher, CIS). This study was conducted as part of a project on gender, welfare, and surveillance, supported by Privacy International, UK.
Located in RAW
Blog Entry Sarah Zia - Not knowing as pedagogy: Ride-hailing drivers in Delhi
by Sarah Zia published Dec 18, 2019 last modified May 19, 2020 06:35 AM — filed under: , , , , , ,
Working in the gig-economy has been associated with economic vulnerabilities. However, there are also moral and affective vulnerabilities as workers find their worth measured everyday by their performance of—and at—work and in every interaction and movement. This essay by Sarah Zia is the second among a series of writings by researchers associated with the 'Mapping Digital Labour in India' project at the CIS, supported by the Azim Premji University, that were published on the Platypus blog of the Committee on the Anthropology of Science, Technology, and Computing (CASTAC). The essay is edited by Noopur Raval, who co-led the project.
Located in RAW
Blog Entry Science, Technology and Society International Conference – Some Afterthoughts
by Samuel Tettner published Mar 14, 2011 last modified May 14, 2015 12:22 PM — filed under: , , ,
An international conference on Science, Technology and Society was held at the Indore Christian College on March 12 and 13. It was sponsored by the Madhya Pradesh Council of Science and Technology, Bhopal and organized by the Indore Christian College. Samuel Tettner, Digital Natives Coordinator from the Centre for Internet and Society attended this conference and is sharing his experience about the workshop.
Located in Digital Natives / Blog
Second Maps for Making Change Workshop: Using Geographical Mapping Techniques to Support Struggles for Social Justice in India
by Anja Kovacs published Jan 30, 2010 last modified Oct 05, 2015 03:09 PM — filed under: , , , , ,
The second workshop of the Maps for Making Change project will take place at the National Institute of Design in Ahmedabad, from 1 until 3 February 2010. The workshop will allow a select group of activists and supporters of social movements and campaigns in India to start developing digital maps that they can use in their advocacy work, under the expert guidance of international digital mapping rights activists, Indian mapping experts, design professionals and techies with an interest in activism. The workshop is organised by the Centre for Internet and Society and Tactical Tech, in cooperation with MediaShala at NID.
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