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Blog Entry Internet Researchers' Conference 2018 (IRC18): Offline - Call for Sessions
by Puthiya Purayil Sneha published Sep 20, 2017 last modified Nov 29, 2017 12:30 PM — filed under: , , ,
Does being offline necessarily mean being disconnected? Beyond anxieties such as FOMO, being offline is also seen as disengagement from a certain milieu of the digital (read: capital), an impediment to the way life is organised by and around technologies in general. However, being offline is not the exception, as examples of internet shutdown and acts on online censorship illustrate the persistence and often alarming regularity of the offline even for the ‘connected’ sections of the population. The *offline* is the theme of the third Internet Researchers' Conference (IRC18). We invite teams of two or more members to submit sessions proposals by Sunday, November 19 (final deadline). The session selection process is described below. The Conference will be hosted by the Sambhaavnaa Institute of Public Policy and Politics (Kandbari, Palampur, Himachal Pradesh) on February 22-24, 2018.
Located in RAW
Blog Entry Internet Researchers' Conference 2018 (IRC18): Offline, February 22-24, Sambhaavnaa Institute
by Sumandro Chattapadhyay published Feb 07, 2018 last modified Jul 02, 2018 06:30 PM — filed under: , , ,
We are proud to announce that the third edition of the Internet Researchers' Conference series will be held at the Sambhaavnaa Institute, Kandbari (Himachal Pradesh) during February 22-24, 2018. This annual conference series was initiated by the Researchers@Work (RAW) programme at CIS in 2016 to gather researchers, academic or otherwise, studying internet in/from India to congregate, share insights and tensions, and chart the ways forward. The *offline* is the theme of the 2018 edition of the conference (IRC18), and the conference agenda will be shaped by nine sessions selected by all the teams that submitted session proposals, and an independent paper track consisting of six presentations.
Located in RAW
Blog Entry Internet Researchers' Conference 2019 (IRC19): #List - Call for Papers
by Puthiya Purayil Sneha published Dec 06, 2018 — filed under: , , ,
Who makes lists? How are lists made? Who can be on a list, and who is missing? What new subjectivities - indicative of different asymmetries of power/knowledge - do list-making, and being listed, engender? What makes lists legitimate information artifacts, and what makes their knowledge contentious? Much debate has emerged about specificities and implications of the list as an information artifact, especially in the case of #LoSHA and NRC - its role in creation and curation of information, in building solidarities and communities of practice, its dependencies on networked media infrastructures, its deployment by hegemonic entities and in turn for countering dominant discourses. For the fourth edition of the Internet Researchers’ Conference (IRC19), we invite papers that engage critically with the form, imagination, and politics of the *list*.
Located in RAW
Blog Entry Internet Researchers' Conference 2019 (IRC19): #List - Selected Sessions and Papers
by Puthiya Purayil Sneha published Jan 02, 2019 last modified Jan 21, 2019 12:11 PM — filed under: , , ,
Here is the list of selected sessions and papers for the Internet Researchers' Conference 2019 (IRC19) - #List. IRC19 will be held in Lamakaan, Hyderabad, from Jan 30 to Feb 1, 2019. The conference announcement, along with the final agenda, will be published on Monday, January 7.
Located in RAW
Blog Entry Internet Researchers' Conference 2019 (IRC19): #List, Jan 30 - Feb 1, Lamakaan
by Puthiya Purayil Sneha published Jan 09, 2019 last modified Jan 31, 2019 06:41 AM — filed under: , , , ,
Who makes lists? How are lists made? Who can be on a list, and who is missing? What new subjectivities - indicative of different asymmetries of power/knowledge - do list-making, and being listed, engender? What makes lists legitimate information artifacts, and what makes their knowledge contentious? Much debate has emerged about specificities and implications of the list as an information artifact, especially in the case of #LoSHA and NRC - its role in creation and curation of information, in building solidarities and communities of practice, its dependencies on networked media infrastructures, its deployment by hegemonic entities and in turn for countering dominant discourses. For the fourth edition of the Internet Researchers’ Conference (IRC19), we invited sessions and papers that engage critically with the form, imagination, and politics of the *list* - to present or propose academic, applied, or creative works that explore its social, economic, cultural, material, political, affective, or aesthetic dimensions. IRC19 will be organised in Lamakaan, Hyderabad, during January 30 - February 1, 2019.
Located in RAW
Blog Entry Internet Researchers' Conference 2019 (IRC19): List - Call for Sessions
by Puthiya Purayil Sneha published Oct 01, 2018 last modified Nov 05, 2018 09:15 AM — filed under: , ,
Who makes lists? How are lists made? Who can be on a list, and who is missing? What new subjectivities - indicative of different asymmetries of power/knowledge - do list-making, and being listed, engender? What makes lists legitimate information artifacts, and what makes their knowledge contentious? Much debate has emerged about specificities and implications of the list as an information artifact, especially in the case of #LoSHA and NRC - its role in creation and curation of information, in building solidarities and communities of practice, its dependencies on networked media infrastructures, its deployment by hegemonic entities and in turn for countering dominant discourses. For the fourth edition of the Internet Researchers’ Conference (IRC19), we invite sessions that engage critically with the form, imagination, and politics of the *list*.
Located in RAW
Blog Entry Internet Researchers' Conference 2022 (IRC22) - Proposed Sessions
by Admin published Mar 17, 2022 last modified Apr 26, 2022 07:07 AM — filed under: , , , ,
Here is the list of sessions proposed for the Internet Researchers' Conference 2022 - #Home.
Located in RAW
Blog Entry Internet Researchers' Conference 2022 (IRC22) - Selected Sessions
by Puthiya Purayil Sneha published Apr 25, 2022 last modified Apr 26, 2022 07:00 AM — filed under: , , ,
Here is the list of selected sessions and individual presentations for the Internet Researchers' Conference (IRC22) - #Home. IRC22 will be held online from May 25-27, 2022. The conference announcement, along with details on registration will be published in the first week of May.
Located in RAW
Blog Entry Internet Researchers' Conference 2022 (IRC22): #Home, May 25-27
by Puthiya Purayil Sneha published May 24, 2022 last modified May 24, 2022 02:38 PM — filed under: , , , , ,
We are excited to announce that the fifth edition of the Internet Researchers' Conference will be held online on May 25-27, 2022.This annual conference series was initiated by the researchers@work (r@w) programme at CIS in 2016 to gather researchers and practitioners engaging with the internet in/from India to congregate, share insights and tensions, and chart the ways forward. This year, the conference brings together a set of reflections and conversations on how we imagine and experience the home —as a space of refuge and comfort, but also as one of violence, care, labour and movement-building.
Located in RAW
Blog Entry Internet, Society & Space in Indian Cities
by Pratyush Shankar published Sep 28, 2011 last modified Jun 29, 2016 09:41 AM — filed under: , , ,
The monograph on Internet, Society and Space in Indian Cities, by Pratyush Shankar, is an entry into debates around making of IT Cities and public planning policies that regulate and restructure the city spaces in India with the emergence of Internet technologies. Going beyond the regular debates on the modern urban, the monograph deploys a team of students from the field of architecture and urban design to investigate how city spaces – the material as well as the experiential – are changing under the rubric of digital globalisation. Placing his inquiry in the built form, Shankar manoeuvres discourse from architecture, design, cultural studies and urban geography to look at the notions of cyber-publics, digital spaces, and planning policy in India. The findings show that the relationship between cities and cyberspaces need to be seen as located in a dynamic set of negotiations and not as a mere infrastructure question. It dismantles the presumptions that have informed public and city planning in the country by producing alternative futures of users’ interaction and mapping of the emerging city spaces.
Located in RAW / Histories of the Internet