Centre for Internet & Society

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Blog Entry Re:Wiring Bodies
by Asha Achuthan published Sep 28, 2011 last modified Apr 14, 2015 12:49 PM — filed under: , , , ,
Asha Achuthan initiates a historical research inquiry to understand the ways in which gendered bodies are shaped by the Internet imaginaries in contemporary India. Tracing the history from nationalist debates between Gandhi and Tagore to the neo-liberal perspective based knowledge produced by feminists like Martha Nussbaum; Asha’s research offers a unique entry point into cyberculture studies through a feminist epistemology of science and technology. The monograph establishes that there is a certain pre-history to the Internet that needs to be unpacked in order to understand the digital interventions on the body in a range of fields from social sciences theory to medical health practices to technology and science policy in the country.
Located in RAW / Histories of the Internet
Blog Entry Silicon Plateau: Volume Two
by Puthiya Purayil Sneha published Dec 19, 2018 last modified Mar 13, 2019 01:01 AM — filed under: , , , , ,
Silicon Plateau is an art project and publishing series that explores the intersection of technology, culture and society in the Indian city of Bangalore. Each volume of the series is a themed repository for research, artworks, essays and interviews that observe the ways technology permeates the urban environment and the lives of its inhabitants. This project is an attempt at creating collaborative research into art and technology, beginning by inviting an interdisciplinary group of contributors (from artists, designers and writers, to researchers, anthropologists and entrepreneurs) to participate in the making of each volume.
Located in RAW
Blog Entry Whose Change is it Anyway?
by Nishant Shah published Jun 18, 2013 last modified Apr 17, 2015 10:56 AM — filed under: , , , , , ,
This thought piece is an attempt to reflect critically on existing practices of “making change” and its implications for the future of citizen action in information and network societies. It observes that change is constantly and explicitly invoked at different stages in research, practice, and policy in relation to digital technologies, citizen action, and network societies.
Located in Digital Natives / Blog