Centre for Internet & Society

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Blog Entry Can Judges Order ISPs to Block Websites for Copyright Infringement? (Part 2)
by Ananth Padmanabhan published Feb 05, 2014 last modified Mar 06, 2014 04:48 PM — filed under: , , , ,
In a three-part study, Ananth Padmanabhan examines the "John Doe" orders that courts have passed against ISPs, which entertainment companies have used to block dozens, if not hundreds, of websites. In this, the second part, he looks at the law laid down by the U.S. Supreme Court and the Delhi High Court on secondary and contributory copyright infringement, and finds that those wouldn't allow Indian courts to grant "John Doe" orders against ISPs.
Located in Access to Knowledge / Blogs
Blog Entry Can Judges Order ISPs to Block Websites for Copyright Infringement? (Part 1)
by Ananth Padmanabhan published Jan 30, 2014 last modified Jan 31, 2014 06:00 AM — filed under: , ,
In a three-part study, Ananth Padmanabhan examines the "John Doe" orders that courts have passed against ISPs, which entertainment companies have used to block dozens, if not hundreds, of websites. In this part, he looks at the theory behind John Doe orders and finds that it would be wrong for Indian courts to grant "John Doe" orders against ISPs.
Located in Access to Knowledge / Blogs
Entertainment industry and Internet piracy in focus
by Prasad Krishna published Sep 17, 2012 — filed under: , ,
The first-of-its-kind initiative by the anti-piracy cell of the Kerala Police to register cases against 1,010 Internet users for uploading or downloading the Malayalam film Bachelor Party has sparked a debate between social media experts and legal puritans on what the law actually says.
Located in News & Media
Blog Entry Analysis of the Copyright (Amendment) Bill 2012
by Pranesh Prakash published May 23, 2012 last modified Nov 12, 2013 02:13 PM — filed under: , , , , , , ,
There are some welcome provisions in the Copyright (Amendment) Bill 2012, and some worrisome provisions. Pranesh Prakash examines five positive changes, four negative ones, and notes the several missed opportunities. The larger concern, though, is that many important issues have not been addressed by these amendments, and how copyright policy is made without evidence and often out of touch with contemporary realities of the digital era.
Located in Access to Knowledge / Blogs
Twists and turns of the SOPA opera
by Prasad Krishna published Jan 16, 2012 — filed under: ,
Proposed DNS filtering threatens the core protocol on which the Internet's universality depends, writes Deepa Kurup in this article published in the Hindu on 15 January 2012. Sunil Abraham is quoted in this.
Located in News & Media
Blog Entry Comment by CIS at ACE on Presentation on French Charter on the Fight against Cyber-Counterfeiting
by Pranesh Prakash published Dec 01, 2011 last modified Dec 01, 2011 11:59 AM — filed under: , , , , , , ,
The seventh session of the World Intellectual Property Organization's Advisory Committee on Enforcement is being held in Geneva on November 30 and December 1, 2011. Pranesh Prakash responded to a presentation by Prof. Pierre Sirinelli of the École de droit de la Sorbonne, Université Paris 1 on 'The French Charter on the Fight against Cyber-Counterfeiting of December 16, 2009' with this comment.
Located in Access to Knowledge / Blogs
Blog Entry Calling Out the BSA on Its BS
by Pranesh Prakash published Sep 09, 2011 last modified Sep 14, 2011 06:16 PM — filed under: , ,
The Business Software Alliance (BSA) is trying to pull wool over government officials' eyes by equating software piracy with tax losses. Pranesh Prakash points out how that argument lacks cogency, and that tax losses would be better averted if BSA's constituent companies just decided to pay full taxes in India.
Located in Access to Knowledge / Blogs
Blog Entry The 2010 Special 301 Report Is More of the Same, Slightly Less Shrill
by Pranesh Prakash published May 13, 2010 last modified Oct 03, 2011 05:37 AM — filed under: , , , , , , , , , ,
Pranesh Prakash examines the numerous flaws in the Special 301 from the Indian perspective, to come to the conclusion that the Indian government should openly refuse to acknowledge such a flawed report. He notes that the Consumers International survey, to which CIS contributed the India report, serves as an effective counter to the Special 301 report.
Located in Access to Knowledge / Blogs
Blog Entry Piracy Studies in India
by Prasad Krishna published Jan 22, 2010 last modified Aug 04, 2011 04:35 AM — filed under: ,
The word ‘piracy’ assumes negative connotations. In the imagination of an ordinary middle class urban Indian it is linked directly to the informal economy, crime and even terrorism. But the ‘pirated good’, that is, the ‘optical disc’ is not seen with a similar perception. The ‘CD’ is the access key to the cultural wealth of music, cinema and software contained inside. This paradox is created in the sphere of information and knowledge that is created by anti-piracy agencies using extensive reports and statistics that are published every year. These statistics often have a tendency to create a feeling of ‘shock and awe’ for the readers that see these numbers splashed across headlines of news and media reports. Till 2004, the creation of numbers conjuring losses up to millions was mostly the domain of the International Intellectual Property Alliance (IIPA), which is now supplemented by reports commissioned to consultancy groups like McKinsey, PWC, and Ernst & Young. This article by Siddharth Chadha traces a few reports that have come to become popular benchmarks of piracy in the past few years.
Located in Access to Knowledge / Blogs
Blog Entry Enforcement of Anti-piracy Laws by the Indian Entertainment Industry
by Prasad Krishna published Jan 22, 2010 last modified Aug 04, 2011 04:35 AM — filed under: , ,
This brief note by Siddharth Chadha seeks to map out the key actors in enforcement of copyright laws. These bodies not only investigate cases of infringement and piracy relating to the entertainment industry, but tie up with the police and IP law firms to pursue actions against the offenders through raids (many of them illegal) and court cases. Siddharth notes that the discourse on informal networks and circuits of distribution of cultural goods remains hijacked with efforts to contain piracy as the only rhetoric which safeguards the business interests of big, mostly multinational, media corporations.
Located in Access to Knowledge / Blogs