Centre for Internet & Society

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Blog Entry Between the Stirrup and the Ground: Relocating Digital Activism
by Nishant Shah published Aug 23, 2011 last modified Oct 25, 2015 05:58 AM — filed under: , , , , ,
In this peer reviewed research paper, Nishant Shah and Fieke Jansen draws on a research project that focuses on understanding new technology, mediated identities, and their relationship with processes of change in their immediate and extended environments in emerging information societies in the global south. It suggests that endemic to understanding digital activism is the need to look at the recalibrated relationships between the state and the citizens through the prism of technology and agency. The paper was published in Democracy & Society, a publication of the Center for Democracy and Civil Society, Volume 8, Issue 2, Summer 2011.
Located in RAW
Blog Entry Material Cyborgs; Asserted Boundaries: Formulating the Cyborg as a Translator
by Nishant Shah published Nov 07, 2011 last modified Oct 25, 2015 05:57 AM — filed under: , , , , ,
In this peer reviewed article, Nishant Shah explores the possibility of formulating the cyborg as an author or translator who is able to navigate between the different binaries of ‘meat–machine’, ‘digital–physical’, and ‘body–self’, using the abilities and the capabilities learnt in one system in an efficient and effective understanding of the other. The article was published in the European Journal of English Studies, Volume 12, Issue 2, 2008. [1]
Located in RAW
Blog Entry New Contexts and Sites of Humanities Practice in the Digital (Paper)
by Puthiya Purayil Sneha published Jun 25, 2018 last modified Dec 06, 2019 05:03 AM — filed under: , , , , ,
The ubiquitous presence of the ‘digital’ over the couple of decades has brought with it several important changes in interdisciplinary forms of research and knowledge production. Particularly in the arts and humanities, the role of digital technologies and internet has always been a rather contentious one, with more debate spurred now due to the growth of fields like humanities computing, digital humanities (henceforth DH) and cultural analytics. Even as these fields signal several shifts in scholarship, pedagogy and practice, portending a futuristic imagination of the role of technology in academia and practice on the one hand, they also reflect continuing challenges related to the digital divide, and more specifically politics around the growth and sustenance of the humanities disciplines. A specific criticism within more recent debates around the origin story of DH in fact, has been its Anglo-American framing, drawing upon a history in humanities computing and textual studies, and located within a larger neoliberal imagination of the university and academia. While this has been met with resistance from across different spaces, thus calling for more diversity and representation in the discourse, it is also reflective of the need to trace and contextualize more local forms of practice and pedagogy in the digital as efforts to address these global concerns. This essay by Puthiya Purayil Sneha draws upon excerpts from a study on the field of DH and related practices in India, to outline the diverse contexts of humanities practice with the advent of the digital and explore the developing discourse around DH in the Indian context.
Located in RAW
Blog Entry Data bleeding everywhere: a story of period trackers
by Sumandro Chattapadhyay published Jun 11, 2019 last modified Dec 06, 2019 05:03 AM — filed under: , , , , , ,
This is an excerpt from an essay by Sadaf Khan, written for and published as part of the Bodies of Evidence collection of Deep Dives. The Bodies of Evidence collection, edited by Bishakha Datta and Richa Kaul Padte, is a collaboration between Point of View and the Centre for Internet and Society, undertaken as part of the Big Data for Development Network supported by International Development Research Centre, Canada.
Located in RAW
Blog Entry Making Humanities in the Digital: Embodiment and Framing in Bichitra and Indiancine.ma
by Puthiya Purayil Sneha published Mar 31, 2018 last modified Jun 25, 2018 12:50 PM — filed under: , , , ,
The growth of the internet and digital technologies in the last couple of decades, and the emergence of new ‘digital objects’ of enquiry has led to a rethinking of research methods across disciplines as well as innovative modes of creative practice. This chapter authored by Puthiya Purayil Sneha (published in 'Making Things and Drawing Boundaries: Experiments in the Digital Humanities' edited by Jentery Sayers) discusses some of the questions that arise around the processes by which digital objects are ‘made’ and made available for arts and humanities research and practice, by drawing on recent work in text and film archival initiatives in India.
Located in RAW
Blog Entry Digital Activism in Asia Reader
by Sumandro Chattapadhyay published Aug 08, 2015 last modified Oct 24, 2015 02:36 PM — filed under: , , , , , ,
The digital turn might as well be marked as an Asian turn. From flash-mobs in Taiwan to feminist mobilisations in India, from hybrid media strategies of Syrian activists to cultural protests in Thailand, we see the emergence of political acts that transform the citizen from being a beneficiary of change to becoming an agent of change. In co-shaping these changes, what the digital shall be used for, and what its consequences will be, are both up for speculation and negotiation. Digital Activism in Asia marks a particular shift where these questions are no longer being refracted through the ICT4D logic, or the West’s attempts to save Asia from itself, but shaped by multiplicity, unevenness, and urgencies of digital sites and users in Asia. It is our great pleasure to present the Digital Activism in Asia Reader.
Located in RAW
Blog Entry Universal Service for Persons with Disabilities: A Global Survey of Policy Interventions and Good Practices
by Nirmita Narasimhan published Dec 27, 2011 last modified Oct 08, 2012 05:43 AM — filed under: , ,
The Global Initiative for Inclusive Information and Communication Technologies and the Centre for Internet and Societies in cooperation with the Hans Foundation have published the Universal Service for Persons with Disabilities: A Global Survey of Policy Interventions and Good Practices. The book consists of a Foreword by Axel Leblois, an Introduction and four chapters. Deepti Bharthur, Axel Leblois and Nirmita Narasimhan have contributed to the chapters.
File Digital Natives with a Cause? Thinkathon: Position Paper
by Prasad Krishna last modified May 08, 2015 12:22 PM — filed under: , , , ,
The Digital Natives with a Cause? research inquiry seeks to look at the potentials of social change and political participation through technology practices of people in emerging ICT contexts. In particular it aims to address knowledge gaps that exist in the scholarship, practice and popular discourse around an increasing usage, adoption and integration of digital and Internet technologies in social transformation processes. A conference called Digital Natives with a Cause? Thinkathon was jointly organised by CIS and Hivos in the Hague in December 2010. The Thinkathon aimed to reflect on these innovations in social transformation processes and its effects on development, and in particular to understand how new processes of social transformation can be supported and sustained, how they can inform our existing practices, and provide avenues of collaboration between Digital Natives and "Analogue Activists".
Located in Digital Natives / Publications
File Digital Natives with a Cause? Report
by Prasad Krishna last modified Apr 17, 2015 11:04 AM — filed under: , , ,
Youth are often seen as potential agents of change for reshaping their own societies. By 2010, the global youth population is expected reach almost 1.2 billion of which 85% reside in developing countries. Unleashing the potential of even a part of this group in developing countries promises a substantially impact on societies. Especially now when youths thriving on digital technologies flood universities, work forces, and governments and could facilitate radical restructuring of the world we live in. So, it’s time we start listening to them.
Located in Digital Natives / Publications
File Links in The Chain - Volume III issue I
by Samuel Tettner last modified Aug 21, 2011 12:36 PM — filed under:
Located in Digital Natives / Publications