Centre for Internet & Society

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Blog Entry It’s Common Practice
by Nishant Shah published May 22, 2013 last modified Apr 24, 2015 11:41 AM — filed under: , ,
Technologies are no longer abstract. They're habits. What constitutes a habit? The gestures that you make as you read this, the way your eyes flick when you encounter somebody you like, the way you stroke your chin in a moment of reflection, or the split second decisions that you make in times of crises — these are all habits. They are pre-thought, visceral, depending upon biological, social and collective memories that do not need rational thinking. Habits are the customised programming of human life.
Located in Digital Natives / Blog
Blog Entry Pleasure and Pornography: Pornography and the Blindfolded Gaze of the Law
by Namita A. Malhotra published Apr 02, 2009 last modified Aug 02, 2011 08:37 AM — filed under: , , , , , , , , , ,
In the legal discourse, pornography as a category is absent, except as an aggravated form of obscenity. Does this missing descriptive category assist in the rampant circulation of pornography, either online or offline? Rather than ask that question, Namita Malhotra, in this second post documenting her CIS-RAW project, explores certain judgments that indeed deal with pornographic texts and uncovers the squeamishness that ensures that pornography as an object keeps disappearing before the law.
Located in RAW / / Blogs / Porn: Law, Video & Technology
Blog Entry Pleasure and Pornography: Impassioned Objects
by Namita A. Malhotra published May 11, 2009 last modified Aug 02, 2011 08:35 AM — filed under: , , , , , , , ,
In this post, a third in the series documenting her CIS-RAW project, Pleasure and Pornography, Namita Malhotra explores the idea of fetish as examined by Anne McClintock (i) . This detour is an exploration of the notion of fetish, its histories and meanings, and how it might relate to the story of Indian porn.
Located in RAW / / Blogs / Porn: Law, Video & Technology
Blog Entry Privacy, pornography, sexuality (a video)
by Namita A. Malhotra published Dec 10, 2009 last modified Aug 02, 2011 08:37 AM — filed under: , , ,
The video is an attempt to use the material collected for purposes of provoking a discussion around privacy, pornography, sexuality and technology. It focuses largely on an Indian context, which most viewers would be familiar with. The video is pegged around the ban of Savita Bhabhi – a pornographic comic toon – but uses that to open up a discussion on various incidents and concepts in relation to pornography and privacy across Asia.
Located in RAW / / Blogs / Porn: Law, Video & Technology
Workshop on Big Data in India: Benefits, Harms, and Human Rights (Delhi, October 01)
by Vanya Rakesh published Sep 20, 2016 last modified Sep 28, 2016 05:53 AM — filed under: , , , , , , , , , ,
CIS welcomes you to participate in the workshop we are organising on Saturday, October 01 at India Habitat Centre, Delhi, to discuss benefits, harms, and human rights implications of big data technologies, and explore potential research questions. A quick RSVP will be much appreciated.
Located in Internet Governance / Events
Chutnefying English - Report
by Nishant Shah published Aug 27, 2009 last modified Aug 27, 2009 06:03 AM — filed under: , , , , ,
The Centre for Internet and Society, Bangalore, was an institutional partner to India's first Global Conference on Hinglish - Chutnefying English, organised by Dr. Rita Kothari at the Mudra Institute of Communications, Ahmedabad. A photographic report for the event is now available here.
Located in Research / Conferences & Workshops / Conference Blogs
Blog Entry Digital AlterNatives with a Cause?
by Nishant Shah published Sep 15, 2011 last modified Apr 10, 2015 09:22 AM — filed under: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Hivos and the Centre for Internet and Society have consolidated their three year knowledge inquiry into the field of youth, technology and change in a four book collective “Digital AlterNatives with a cause?”. This collaboratively produced collective, edited by Nishant Shah and Fieke Jansen, asks critical and pertinent questions about theory and practice around 'digital revolutions' in a post MENA (Middle East - North Africa) world. It works with multiple vocabularies and frameworks and produces dialogues and conversations between digital natives, academic and research scholars, practitioners, development agencies and corporate structures to examine the nature and practice of digital natives in emerging contexts from the Global South.
Located in Digital Natives / Blog
File Re:wiring Bodies - Dr. Asha Achuthan
by Nishant Shah last modified Sep 21, 2011 07:23 AM — filed under: , , , , ,
First draft of the monograph on "Rewiring Bodies" by Dr. Asha Achutan; format for Microsoft Office users
Located in RAW
Blog Entry In Search of the Other: Decoding Digital Natives
by Nishant Shah published Dec 01, 2011 last modified May 14, 2015 12:12 PM — filed under: , ,
This is the first post of a research inquiry that questions the ways in which we have understood the Youth-Technology-Change relationship in the contemporary digital world, especially through the identity of ‘Digital Native’. Drawing from three years of research and current engagements in the field, the post begins a critique of how we need to look at the outliers, the people on the fringes in order to unravel the otherwise celebratory nature of discourse about how the digital is changing the world.
Located in Digital Natives
Blog Entry Revisiting Techno-euphoria
by Nishant Shah published Jul 11, 2012 last modified Apr 24, 2015 11:53 AM — filed under: , ,
In my last post, I talked about techno-euphoria as a condition that seems to mark much of our discourse around digital technologies and the promise of the future. The euphoria, as I had suggested, manifests itself either as a utopian view of how digital technologies are going to change the future that we inhabit, or woes of despair about how the overdetermination of the digital is killing the very fibre of our social fabric.
Located in Digital Natives