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Workshop on Big Data in India: Benefits, Harms, and Human Rights (Delhi, October 01)
by Vanya Rakesh published Sep 20, 2016 last modified Sep 28, 2016 05:53 AM — filed under: , , , , , , , , , ,
CIS welcomes you to participate in the workshop we are organising on Saturday, October 01 at India Habitat Centre, Delhi, to discuss benefits, harms, and human rights implications of big data technologies, and explore potential research questions. A quick RSVP will be much appreciated.
Located in Internet Governance / Events
Blog Entry Availability and Accessibility of Government Information in Public Domain
by Sunil Abraham published Dec 09, 2014 last modified Dec 30, 2014 01:25 AM — filed under: , , , ,
The information provided on most Government websites such as Acts, notifications, rules, orders, minutes of meetings and consultations, etc. is usually in the form of electronic documents. However, these lack authenticity and accessibility and cannot be (text) searched., This policy brief identifies the problem areas with the current work flow being used to publish documents and proposes suitable modifications to make them easy to locate, authentic and accessible.
Located in Accessibility / Blog
Blog Entry P.P. Sneha - Mapping Digital Humanities in India
by P.P. Sneha published Dec 30, 2016 last modified Dec 31, 2016 05:56 AM — filed under: , , , , , , , , ,
It gives us great pleasure to publish the second title of the CIS Papers series. This report by P.P. Sneha comes out of an extended research project supported by the Kusuma Trust. The study undertook a detailed mapping of digital practices in arts and humanities scholarship, both emerging and established, in India. Beginning with an understanding of Digital Humanities as a 'found term' in the Indian context, the study explores the discussion and debate about the changes in humanities practice, scholarship and pedagogy that have come about with the digital turn. Further it inquires about the spaces and roles of digital technologies in the humanities, and by extension in the arts, media, and creative practice today; transformations in the objects and methods of study and practice in these spaces; and the shifts in the imagination of the ‘digital’ itself, and its linkages with humanities practices.
Located in Papers